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What is hair made of and how is it moisturized naturally with no hair products?

To properly care for our hair we must understand our body at it's core. For so long we've been working from the outside in instead of from the inside out.Let's go back to the CORE and build a new firm foundation brick by brick. So what is our hair made of?


Keratin: The main structural component of hair is keratin, a fibrous and helical protein. Keratin is also found in other parts of the body, such as nails and the outer layer of the skin. Keratin is a versatile structural protein that plays a crucial role in various parts of the body. Keratin's fibrous and helical structure gives these tissues their durability and resistance to wear and tear. Its presence in multiple parts of the body highlights its importance in maintaining the integrity and functionality of various biological structures.

  • Hair: As previously mentioned, keratin is the primary component of hair. It provides strength and structure to hair strands.

  • Nails: Keratin is also a major component of nails, making them strong and resilient.

  • Skin: The outermost layer of the skin, called the epidermis, contains keratinocytes that produce keratin. This helps create a protective barrier for the skin, guarding against environmental factors and pathogens.

  • Feathers and Horns: In animals, keratin is present in structures like feathers and horns, providing strength and rigidity.

  • Hooves and Claws: Hooves of animals like horses and the claws of various animals are composed mainly of keratin.

  • Beaks and Bills: Keratin is found in the beaks and bills of birds, helping them grasp and manipulate objects.



Melanin: The color of hair is determined by the presence and type of melanin, a pigment produced by melanocytes in the hair follicles. Eumelanin gives hair colors ranging from brown to black, while pheomelanin produces red and yellow pigments. Melanin is the pigment responsible for the color of hair, and it's produced by specialized cells called melanocytes located in the hair follicles. There are two primary types of melanin that contribute to different hair colors:

  1. Eumelanin: This type of melanin produces shades of brown to black hair. The more eumelanin present, the darker the hair color will be.

  2. Pheomelanin: Pheomelanin produces red and yellow pigments, resulting in red, blonde, and ginger hair colors. The amount and ratio of pheomelanin to eumelanin determine the specific shade of these colors.

The combination and distribution of these two types of melanin in the hair follicle determine your natural hair color. As people age, the production of melanin may decrease, leading to gray or white hair.

Hair color is a fascinating aspect of genetics and biology, and it can be influenced by various factors, including genetics, hormones, and environmental factors. If you have any more questions or if there's anything specific you'd like to know about hair or related topics, please feel free to ask.


Lipids: Hair also contains lipids (fats), which help to maintain its flexibility and moisture balance. Lipids, or fats, are an essential component of hair's structure and play a vital role in maintaining its health. Here's a bit more detail:

Lipids in hair primarily serve two crucial functions:

  1. Moisture Retention: Lipids form a protective barrier on the hair's surface, helping to prevent excessive moisture loss. This barrier is especially important in dry or low-humidity environments, as it keeps the hair hydrated and minimizes dryness and frizz.

  2. Flexibility and Smoothness: Lipids contribute to the flexibility and suppleness of hair strands. They help hair maintain its natural elasticity and prevent it from becoming brittle or prone to breakage.

Hair's lipid content can be affected by various factors, including genetics, diet, and hair care practices. Using hair products that contain beneficial lipids, such as certain oils and conditioners, can help improve the lipid balance in your hair and keep it looking healthy and shiny.


The exact lipids found in the hair shaft are quite complex and consist of various types of fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol. These lipids work together to maintain the structural integrity and moisture balance of the hair. Here are the primary types of lipids commonly found in the hair shaft:

  1. Ceramides: Ceramides are a crucial class of lipids in hair. They help to form a protective barrier on the hair's surface, which locks in moisture and maintains the hair's strength and flexibility.

  2. Fatty Acids: Various fatty acids, such as palmitic acid and oleic acid, are found in the hair. These fatty acids contribute to the lubrication and softness of the hair.

  3. Cholesterol: Cholesterol molecules are present in the hair shaft, and they assist in maintaining the hair's structural integrity and moisture balance.

  4. Squalene: Squalene is a lipid that helps lubricate the hair and prevent it from becoming excessively dry or brittle.

These lipids work together to keep the hair cuticle smooth, prevent moisture loss, and protect the hair from damage. When the lipid balance in the hair is disrupted, it can lead to issues like dryness, frizz, and breakage. Using hair care products that contain lipid-rich ingredients can help restore and maintain the health of your hair.


The lipids found in the hair shaft are not produced by the hair itself but are derived from the sebaceous glands in the scalp. Here's how these lipids are produced and distributed:

  1. Sebaceous Glands: Your scalp contains sebaceous glands, which are small glands located near the hair follicles. These glands produce an oily substance called sebum.

  2. Sebum Production: Sebum is composed of various lipids, including fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, and wax esters. These lipids are synthesized by the sebaceous glands.

  3. Distribution: Sebum is released from the sebaceous glands and travels along the hair shaft and skin surface. Its primary purpose is to lubricate the hair and skin, keeping them moisturized and preventing excessive dryness.

  4. Hair and Skin Health: Sebum plays a crucial role in maintaining the health and condition of both the hair and the skin. It helps protect the hair from environmental damage, keeps it flexible, and prevents it from becoming too dry or brittle.

The balance of sebum production can vary among individuals and can be influenced by factors such as genetics, hormones, and overall health. If the sebaceous glands produce too much sebum, it can lead to oily hair and skin. Conversely, insufficient sebum production can result in dryness.

Proper hair care practices, including regular washing and conditioning, can help maintain a healthy balance of sebum and lipids on the scalp and hair.



Sebum serves as a natural lubricant for both the hair and the skin. Here's a bit more detail about how sebum distribution works:

  1. Lubrication: Sebum is produced by the sebaceous glands and is released through hair follicles onto the skin and hair shaft. It forms a thin, protective layer that lubricates the hair, making it supple and less prone to breakage. This lubrication also helps to maintain the skin's flexibility and moisture.

  2. Protection: Beyond lubrication, sebum also provides a protective barrier for the skin and hair. It can help shield against environmental factors like wind, UV radiation, and pollutants.

  3. Moisture Balance: Sebum helps in maintaining the moisture balance of the skin and hair. By preventing excessive moisture loss, it aids in keeping both the scalp and hair strands hydrated.

  4. Natural Conditioning: Sebum contains lipids, including fatty acids and cholesterol, which contribute to the softness and sheen of the hair. This natural conditioning can enhance the appearance and manageability of your hair.

It's worth noting that the amount of sebum produced can vary from person to person and can be influenced by factors such as genetics, hormones, and age. Proper hair care practices, such as regular cleansing with a suitable shampoo and conditioner, are essential to manage sebum production and maintain a healthy scalp and hair.





Water: Hair contains a small percentage of water, which contributes to its overall flexibility and strength. Hair itself does not contain water within its structure. Instead, it absorbs moisture from the environment. The moisture content in the air, humidity levels, and the use of water-based hair products can all influence the moisture balance of your hair.

The structure of hair includes three main layers:

  • Cuticle: The outermost layer of hair, composed of overlapping protective scales. It plays a crucial role in protecting the inner layers and giving hair its shine.

  • Cortex: The middle layer, containing most of the hair's keratin. It determines the strength, elasticity, and color of the hair.

  • Medulla: The innermost layer, which may or may not be present in all hair types. It consists of cells and air spaces.

While some protein is essential for hair health, too much can lead to stiffness, dryness, and breakage. To address this issue and maintain healthy hair.


To maintain optimal hair health and prevent dryness, it's important to consider environmental factors and use hydrating hair products when necessary. Additionally, drinking enough water and maintaining overall hydration can indirectly contribute to the moisture balance of your hair and improve its appearance.


A decrease in scalp sebum production can occur due to various factors, and it's important to identify the underlying cause to address it effectively. Here are some common reasons for decreased scalp sebum production:

  1. Aging: Sebum production tends to decrease naturally with age. As people get older, the sebaceous glands may become less active, leading to reduced sebum secretion.

  2. Hormonal Changes: Hormonal fluctuations, such as those that occur during menopause or as a result of certain medical conditions, can impact sebum production. Hormonal imbalances can lead to both increased or decreased sebum production.

  3. Medications: Some medications, particularly those used to treat acne (like isotretinoin), can significantly reduce sebum production as a side effect.

  4. Excessive Washing: Overwashing the hair and scalp with harsh shampoos can strip away sebum and lead to decreased production as a response.

  5. Skin Conditions: Certain skin conditions, such as seborrheic dermatitis or psoriasis, can affect sebum production. In these cases, sebum production may be disrupted or altered.

  6. Genetics: Your genetic makeup plays a role in determining your sebum production. Some individuals naturally have oilier or drier scalps.

  7. Diet and Nutrition: An inadequate diet lacking essential fatty acids and nutrients can impact sebum production. A balanced diet that includes healthy fats can support skin health.

  8. Stress and Lifestyle: Chronic stress and an unhealthy lifestyle can affect hormone levels, potentially influencing sebum production.

  9. Underlying Medical Conditions: Some medical conditions, such as thyroid disorders, can impact hormone levels and sebum production.

  10. Environmental Factors: Exposure to harsh environmental conditions, like extreme cold or dry air, can affect sebum production temporarily.

If you're experiencing a significant decrease in scalp sebum production and it's causing issues like dryness or discomfort, it's advisable to consult a dermatologist or healthcare professional. They can evaluate your scalp and overall health, identify the underlying cause, and recommend appropriate treatments or lifestyle adjustments to address the issue effectively.

Increasing sebum production on the scalp can be beneficial for maintaining healthy hair and scalp, but it's important to strike the right balance. Excessive sebum can lead to an oily scalp, which can cause other issues like dandruff or clogged hair follicles. However, if you feel your scalp is excessively dry and you'd like to promote healthier sebum production, here are some tips:

  1. Balanced Diet: Ensure your diet includes essential nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins (particularly B vitamins), and minerals like zinc. These nutrients can support healthy sebum production.

  2. Hydration: Drink plenty of water to maintain overall skin and scalp health. Proper hydration can help maintain sebum production.

  3. Gentle Cleansing: Use a mild, sulfate-free shampoo to cleanse your scalp. Overwashing with harsh shampoos can strip away sebum and lead to dryness. Aim to wash your hair as needed rather than excessively.

  4. Scalp Massage: Gently massaging your scalp with your fingertips can stimulate blood circulation and help distribute sebum evenly. This can also promote a healthy scalp environment.

  5. Essential Oils: Some essential oils, such as tea tree oil, lavender oil, and rosemary oil, can help regulate sebum production when used in moderation. Dilute them with a carrier oil and massage them into your scalp.

  6. Healthy Fats: Include sources of healthy fats in your diet, such as avocados, nuts, seeds, and fatty fish. These fats can support sebum production and overall skin health.

  7. Avoid Over-Styling: Excessive use of heat styling tools and hair products can contribute to dryness and affect sebum production. Minimize the use of such products and consider heat protectants.

  8. Balanced Hair Care Products: Choose hair care products that are formulated for your hair type. Avoid products that strip away sebum or contain harsh chemicals.

  9. Stress Management: Chronic stress can impact hormone levels, which in turn can affect sebum production. Practicing stress management techniques can be beneficial.

Remember that achieving the right balance of sebum production is essential. If you're experiencing significant scalp issues related to dryness or excessive oiliness, it's advisable to consult a dermatologist or healthcare professional for a proper evaluation and personalized guidance.

  1. Rosemary: Rosemary is often used in hair care for its potential to improve circulation in the scalp. While it doesn't directly increase sebum production, improved circulation can support a healthy scalp environment.

  2. Lavender: Lavender oil is known for its soothing properties and may help maintain a balanced scalp. It can be used as part of a holistic approach to scalp health.

  3. Nettle Leaf: Nettle leaf contains various nutrients and minerals that may support overall hair and scalp health. It can be consumed as an herbal tea or taken as a supplement.

  4. Horsetail: Horsetail is a source of silica, which is important for hair strength and structure. While it doesn't directly influence sebum production, it can contribute to overall hair health.


It's important to use these herbs and natural ingredients in moderation and as part of a holistic hair care routine. If you have specific concerns about your scalp or hair health, consider consulting with a dermatologist or a healthcare professional for personalized guidance and recommendations tailored to your individual needs.


Increasing sebum production on the scalp can be beneficial for maintaining healthy hair and scalp, but it's important to strike the right balance. Excessive sebum can lead to an oily scalp, which can cause other issues like dandruff or clogged hair follicles. However, if you feel your scalp is excessively dry and you'd like to promote healthier sebum production, here are some tips:

  1. Balanced Diet: Ensure your diet includes essential nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins (particularly B vitamins), and minerals like zinc. These nutrients can support healthy sebum production.

  2. Hydration: Drink plenty of water to maintain overall skin and scalp health. Proper hydration can help maintain sebum production.

  3. Gentle Cleansing: Use a mild, sulfate-free shampoo to cleanse your scalp. Overwashing with harsh shampoos can strip away sebum and lead to dryness. Aim to wash your hair as needed rather than excessively.

  4. Scalp Massage: Gently massaging your scalp with your fingertips can stimulate blood circulation and help distribute sebum evenly. This can also promote a healthy scalp environment.

  5. Essential Oils: Some essential oils, such as tea tree oil, lavender oil, and rosemary oil, can help regulate sebum production when used in moderation. Dilute them with a carrier oil and massage them into your scalp.

  6. Healthy Fats: Include sources of healthy fats in your diet, such as avocados, nuts, seeds, and fatty fish. These fats can support sebum production and overall skin health.

  7. Avoid Over-Styling: Excessive use of heat styling tools and hair products can contribute to dryness and affect sebum production. Minimize the use of such products and consider heat protectants.

  8. Balanced Hair Care Products: Choose hair care products that are formulated for your hair type. Avoid products that strip away sebum or contain harsh chemicals.

  9. Stress Management: Chronic stress can impact hormone levels, which in turn can affect sebum production. Practicing stress management techniques can be beneficial.

Remember that achieving the right balance of sebum production is essential. If you're experiencing significant scalp issues related to dryness or excessive oiliness, it's advisable to consult a dermatologist or healthcare professional for a proper evaluation and personalized guidance.

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