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Glycerite 101

Updated: Mar 8, 2023

Glycerin, also known as glycerol, is a colorless, odorless, and viscous liquid that is commonly used in various industries.



It is a sugar alcohol that is derived from fats and oils, often through a process called hydrolysis.

Glycerin has a wide range of uses, including as a moisturizer in skincare products, a sweetener in food and beverages, a solvent in pharmaceuticals, a lubricant in industrial applications, and as a component in explosives and antifreeze.


One of the unique properties of glycerin is its ability to attract water molecules, which makes it a valuable ingredient in many cosmetic and personal care products. It is also non-toxic, non-irritating, and biodegradable, which makes it a popular ingredient in environmentally friendly products.

Overall, glycerin is a versatile and important compound that has a wide range of applications across various industries.




Vegetable glycerin is typically made from plant-based sources such as coconut oil, palm oil, or soybean oil. The process of making vegetable glycerin involves the following steps:

  1. Hydrolysis: The first step involves the hydrolysis of the fats or oils. This is done by adding water and a strong alkaline solution, such as sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide, to the fats or oils. This breaks down the fats or oils into their individual fatty acid molecules and glycerin.

  2. Purification: The mixture is then heated to remove excess water and impurities. The remaining mixture is a crude form of glycerin that contains some impurities.

  3. Distillation: The crude glycerin is then distilled to remove any remaining impurities and water. The resulting product is a pure form of glycerin.

  4. Filtration: The pure glycerin is then filtered to remove any remaining particles.

  5. Concentration: The glycerin is then concentrated to the desired strength.

Overall, the process of making vegetable glycerin involves breaking down plant-based fats or oils into their individual fatty acid molecules and glycerin through hydrolysis, purifying the glycerin through distillation and filtration, and then concentrating it to the desired strength. The resulting product is a clear, colorless, odorless, and viscous liquid that is commonly used in various industries.


Glycerin can be beneficial for hair in several ways:

  1. Moisturizing: Glycerin is a humectant, which means it attracts and holds onto water molecules. When used in hair care products, glycerin can help moisturize the hair by attracting moisture from the air and keeping it locked into the hair shaft. This can help prevent dryness and brittleness in hair.

  2. Softening: Glycerin can also help soften hair by penetrating the hair shaft and making it more pliable. This can make hair easier to comb and style.

  3. Strengthening: Glycerin can help strengthen hair by improving its elasticity. When hair is more elastic, it can better withstand the stress of daily wear and tear, such as brushing, combing, and styling.

  4. Preventing breakage: Glycerin can help prevent hair breakage by minimizing the amount of moisture that is lost from the hair shaft. This can help hair retain its strength and resilience over time.

Overall, glycerin can be a beneficial ingredient in hair care products because of its ability to moisturize, soften, strengthen, and protect hair. However, it is important to note that glycerin can also have some drawbacks if used in high concentrations or in very dry climates, as it can potentially draw moisture away from the hair and cause frizz or dryness. Therefore, it is recommended to use hair care products that contain glycerin in moderation and to pair them with other moisturizing ingredients to achieve the best results.





While glycerin has many benefits, there are also some potential drawbacks to using it:

  1. Humectant properties: As a humectant, glycerin attracts moisture from the air and can draw water from the hair shaft, which can cause hair to become frizzy or dry in very dry climates or when used in high concentrations.

  2. Sticky texture: Glycerin can have a sticky texture, which can make hair feel heavy or weighed down, particularly if used in high concentrations.

  3. Interference with styling: When used in high concentrations, glycerin can interfere with some styling products, such as gels and mousses, by causing them to flake or not adhere properly.

  4. Incompatibility with certain hair types: Some people may find that glycerin does not work well with their hair type, particularly if their hair is already naturally oily or prone to buildup.

  5. Allergic reactions: While rare, some people may be allergic to glycerin and may experience symptoms such as itching, redness, or swelling.

Overall, glycerin can be a useful ingredient in hair care products, but it is important to use it in moderation and to be aware of any potential sensitivities or incompatibilities with individual hair types.






The Formulation



Herbal glycerites, also known as glycerin tinctures, are a simple and easy way to extract the beneficial properties of herbs using glycerin as a solvent. Here's a basic recipe for making herbal glycerites:

Ingredients:

  • Dried herbs of your choice

  • Vegetable glycerin

  • Distilled water

Equipment:

  • Glass jar with a tight-fitting lid

  • Cheesecloth or muslin cloth

  • Strainer

  • Measuring cups

  • Funnel

  • Amber glass dropper bottles

Instructions:

  1. Fill a glass jar with your dried herbs, leaving about one-third of the jar empty.

  2. Add vegetable glycerin to the jar until the herbs are fully covered, leaving a bit of space at the top.

  3. Add distilled water to the jar, making sure the liquid level is about 1 inch above the herbs.

  4. Use a spoon or a chopstick to stir the mixture and ensure the herbs are fully coated with the liquid.

  5. Secure the lid tightly on the jar and store it in a cool, dark place for about 4-6 weeks, shaking the jar gently every few days.

  6. After 4-6 weeks, strain the mixture through a cheesecloth or muslin cloth into a measuring cup, squeezing out as much liquid as possible.

  7. Use a funnel to transfer the glycerite into amber glass dropper bottles.

  8. Label the bottles with the name of the herb and the date of preparation.

Your herbal glycerite is now ready to use! You can add a few drops to water, tea, or other beverages, or apply it directly to the skin. Note that the dosage may vary depending on the herb and the intended use, so be sure to research the herb you are using and consult with a healthcare professional if needed.





Herbal glycerites, also known as glycerin tinctures, are a convenient and easy way to use herbs as medicine. Here are some general guidelines for using herbal glycerites:

  1. Dosage: The dosage of herbal glycerites will depend on the herb and the intended use. Always follow the instructions on the label or consult with a healthcare professional for guidance. In general, a standard dose for adults is 30-60 drops (1-2 dropperfuls) up to three times per day. Children and those with sensitive constitutions may require a lower dose.

  2. Administration: Herbal glycerites can be taken directly under the tongue, added to water or other beverages, or applied topically to the skin.

  3. Timing: The timing of herbal glycerite administration can vary depending on the herb and the intended use. Some herbs may be best taken on an empty stomach, while others may be better absorbed with food. Always follow the instructions on the label or consult with a healthcare professional for guidance.

  4. Storage: Herbal glycerites should be stored in a cool, dark place away from heat and light. They can generally be stored for several months to a year, but may lose potency over time.

  5. Safety: While herbal glycerites can be safe and effective, they can also interact with certain medications or have side effects. Always consult with a healthcare professional before using herbal glycerites, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, or taking any medications.

Some popular herbs that are commonly used in glycerin tinctures include echinacea, ginger, chamomile, valerian, and milk thistle. Again, always consult with a healthcare professional for guidance on the appropriate herb and dosage for your individual needs.


For more information on my favorite tea for healthy hair skin and nails.




Watch the full video on the process inside Guru VIP!


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